Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Defining Operations on the First-Due


First-due company operations are influenced by a number of parameters and factors; some deliberate and dictated, others prescribed and prearranged and yet others subjective, biased, predisposed or at times accidental, casual and emotional. For many of you riding the seat or arriving assuming command; you understand the connotations and implications I'm making here.

Here’s an excellent discussion and debate point to bring up, when time permits today or this evening with your company or personnel; one that leads to a multitude of viewpoints, opinions and divisions.

On the first-due; what are the three or four key parameters when confronted with arrival indications of a fire within a structure that define your deployment and transition into operations?

Now, before everyone gets worked up; we all realize there are numerous variables affecting key decision-points that must be recognized, imputed, synthesized , analyzed and decisions made, assignments formulated and the task deployed; this list can be long - very long.

However, giving a building and occupancy with indications of a fire within, what has your experience provided you with the KEY influencing parameters? Are there key factors, or are there "lists" of factors based upon yet another "list" of conditions. The question is rhetorical the answeres are not.

Is it occupancy type, occupancy risk, fire behavior or fire dynamics, time, risk, communicated information, past performance factors (experience), presumed or known life hazards, predicated building or system performance, crew KSA sets or other factors, etc? Does naturalistic or RPDM decision-making influence; is the deployment tactically driven or predisposed by SOP, SOG or personal attributes and biases? Safety Conscious or aggressively driven? You get the picture.....

Try to distill them down to three or four mission critical key issues (if you can). This is a great exercise to see what everyone else considers the key factors to be or should be when deploying and going into operations; sometimes it’s more complex than just “pulling the line” or getting in….

Take the time to talk about the determinations made, question the rational and use some critical thinking and don’t be subjective….think about the responses and ask why?
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2 comments:

  1. It is weird to me, because I always assumed it was whoever was closer, and this is making it sound like it is whatever company is larger... maybe I am not reading this correctly...

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  2. Amazing! Very well said Christopher. Thank you for sharing this informative tips. I will follow your advice though I'm not a fire fighter, at least I know important things about this job and how things worked. Firefighting is one of the risky types of job. I salute firemen for their bravery and dedication.

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