Wednesday, October 14, 2009

The four legs of a stool.

According to a survey conducted by Suzanne Bates, author of "Motivate Like a CEO: Communicate Your Strategic Vision and Inspire People to Act! there is a real need for improvements in leaders’ ability to communicate the mission, vision, and core values of the organization to employees. She notes this is especially challenging in times of downturn and recession.

It is during these difficult times that the organizational mission and vision can become obscured and blurry as employees look out for themselves and the short-term objective of survival.

According to the participants in her survey, the top challenges for organizational leaders included (in order):

1. Communicating purpose and mission to all employees (66 percent).

2. Strategic thinking (62 percent).

3. Connecting people to a shared purpose (59 percent).

4. Engaging employees (58 percent).

5. Motivating employees (56 percent).

6. Vision (54 percent).

7. Moving from tactical to strategic (43 percent).

8. Decisiveness (35 percent).

It’s easy to lead in the good times where prosperity is abounding. During the troubled times is when leaders need to help keep the organization focused on what’s most important… mission… vision… core values.

Mission = purpose
Vision = direction
Core Values = beliefs
Communications = understanding

These four things form the legs of a stool upon which the success of your organization rests.
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2 comments:

  1. I believe that many people in the fire service do not truly view their fire department as a business. A fire department is basically a business with employees and expenses. What gets lost is the higher ranks (i.e. Chief, Assistant Chief, Battalion Chief, etc) are basically upper management. The front line officers are the supervisors. Every officer needs to know how to manage not just firefighters on the fire ground but also as people and employees.

    My observations are coming from what I see in POC and combination departments. Employees need to be recognized for the successes and constructively criticized for mistakes. I think that good fire chiefs are not just an encyclopedia of fire service experience and knowledge. They must be a great manager of employee, because the employees are a business’s greatest asset!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I believe that many people in the fire service do not truly view their fire department as a business. A fire department is basically a business with employees and expenses. What gets lost is the higher ranks (i.e. Chief, Assistant Chief, Battalion Chief, etc) are basically upper management. The front line officers are the supervisors. Every officer needs to know how to manage not just firefighters on the fire ground but also as people and employees.

    My observations are coming from what I see in POC and combination departments. Employees need to be recognized for the successes and constructively criticized for mistakes. I think that good fire chiefs are not just an encyclopedia of fire service experience and knowledge. They must be a great manager of employee, because the employees are a business’s greatest asset!

    ReplyDelete

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