Tuesday, December 2, 2008

Scene Safety Above All Else.

I read this with some interest: Police arrest NM ambulance personnel on scene.

When you read the article, something pops out.

The ambulance personnel interviewed believes that cops and medics are on different pages at a scene. Though they may provide different types of services, I believe that both agencies should be on the same page where it comes to scene safety.

The one medic states that the cops have safety and they have patient care. I disagree 100% with this statement. BOTH agencies should be thinking about safety and patient care. I don't see these two concerns being at odds with each other, so the responders shouldn't be at odds.

Public servants are a special breed. They should respect each other and support each other. Their actions at a scene should be integrated, seamless and in some cases, transparent.

For me, it is embarrassing to see cops arresting firefighters and medics at a scene.

What would be worse is if we ever see a judge convict someone for following their agency's protocol.
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5 comments:

  1. we all must relise that each has a job to do and if an arrest has to made, surely this can be done in private at the station after the incident. In New Zealand our Fire Service Act protects fire fighters from most of thses problems that you appear to face in the US

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  2. I feel #1 the ambulance person should not of touched the police officer,no way! But, I know there alot of times when there issues over the Law Enforcement Agencies & Fre/Rescue & medical perssonel. I've seen time & time again where a lawyer looks @ You says "They have a badge & Gun" Then shruggs his/hers shoulder. My view is Let me do my job & do not tell me how to do it or try doing it because You wear a badge & carry a gun!! Then I'll clear the scene after my job is done & You can do what ever makes You happy! Does it happen, No! very rare, & that's why there is shall We say bad blood among agentcies who have to deal with a person with a badge & a Gun! Even Towtruck drivers get this re-action from Police. In all honesty, I don't want that job, nor try & tell them what our jobs are. It creates more tention. It'll be interesting to how this plays out.

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  3. been on all three sides of this one...medic, law and fire...no easy choices....but...communication is key and that is what is needed. Get out of your hall and go have a chat with the local law enforcement. Have a tri service supper in the station and invite your favorite cops and medics. You go out as a firefighter and find yourself staring down the barrel of a crazy at an arson scene...you want to be on best terms with law and ems....you get hurt or burned...ems takes care of you...and law covers you while your being triaged....that is it. We own our behaviour and we own the responsability to make the big "IT" work. So lets see about taking it up to the next level of communication. Talk to eachother before we go out. Common Sense since all three services get cut, bleed and die all to often....

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  4. one other thought.....Deputy Sheriff Anne Jackson Skagit County Washington State...Shot to death point blank while trying to have a psycho answer his door to fill out a witness statement. She knew the individual and had helped him on previous occasions. He had just been released from jail. He went on to murder 5 other civilians on his way to turn himself in at the sheriffs office. Anne was 40 years old and well respected by her peers. She was murdered on Sept 2nd 2008. Some 5000 law enforcement, fire and ems personal attended her field of honor service. Law Enforcement have a job to do...we are not cops...and as such, they not ems or fire carry the force multiplier....cuff the patient....and let me treat them while they are restrained....It is violent, dangerous, and non forgiving when it comes to makeing a scene descision regarding first responder safety.....from my p.o.v. law enforcement did their job....now lets let the courts have a look at both sides....

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