Tuesday, December 30, 2008

OSHA-Public Safety Standards? I Wish!

If you go to www.osha.gov, you will find that there are various occupations that have standards written specifically for them. You have General Industry, Construction, Healthcare, Ship building and Meatpacking, among others.

With the most recent government “insertion”, I think that it is time to give serious thought to developing specific standards for firefighting. Yeah, I know that there are provisions for fire protection, but they hardly go far enough to address the complexities of this business.


I hate ambiguity and generalizations and especially where there is wide latitude to cite and fine entities for “violations” of the standards.

So, if OSHA wants to be in our business, then let’s get rid of the “See NFPA 1500” references, write them into a final rule, adopt it and let us take care of the business.


And OSHA really needs to hire folks that have more than an ancillary interest in firefighting. Same goes for the rules makers.


It needs to be made abundantly clear that firefighting is not the same as de-boning a hog or driving a forklift.


Why? Check this out, compliments of Chief BillyG: http://firefighterclosecalls.com/fullstory.php?75264
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6 comments:

  1. Chief BillY: I have just skimmed over the written report on this call. It should be noted as an exceptional bit of work on two counts. 1) That you shared it here and we had a chance to gain additonal knowledge of the event..so thanks for that. 2) The dept and those who supported the event deserve a very high service complament for a job "well done" in the script and manner by which they organized the report and put it out on the internet for all to see. It is not easy to "air the laundry" but..they did it in such a way so as to "impact operations" in "other departments". Gaining the insights from these "gold nuggets of knowledge" allows others to read and review their own safety habits and operational considerations. So for me...a read well worth it. For others...take the time to read it...my heart was racing half way through the report and I was not on scene...but did feel the impact and drama. This should be a model which is used in any submission for additonal manpower on budgets...if there is any doubt about manpower shortages on the fireground impacting the outcome this report says and shows it all. Well done gentlemen of the fire services. For those injured and continuing to feel the effects of their injuries I say....get well soon...we are praying for you and want a speedy recovery.
    firefighterveteran.com

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  2. Art: thanks for your work on bringing this to the kitchen table...24/7/365 we hammer away at the safety issues. That everyone went home is a testament to the training integrity and grit of those who were on the front lines and in the "battle zone". I look forward to additonal postings on keeping our services in tune with what is going on "out there on the fireline.
    Stay safe
    shannon pennington firefightervetern.com

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  3. FFVet:
    If you really want an eye opener, read the NIOSH LODD on BCFD FPA Rachel Wilson.
    I am amazed that in the 21st century, we still struggle with "certain" regulatory and statuatory requirements.
    It is counter-intuitive to my belief that NO ONE should die during a training exercise.
    Art

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  4. Good points, well made...tho wouldnt hold my breath. as evidenced by this article from over 20 years ago

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  5. It always has been my belief that the training ground is where we are supposed to make the mistakes and learn from them as well as hone our ability to do the "evolution". Mistakes that kill are never excused except under the adverse conditons of the fire ground where the element of the unknown always is a risk to the individual. To have a training fatality is and always will point to "command failure" at some point. When we had horses drawing the wagons and hose carts...the horses would go until they dropped. Seems like we still have the "tude" in some departments....my pov.

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  6. FFVet:
    If you really want an eye opener, read the NIOSH LODD on BCFD FPA Rachel Wilson.
    I am amazed that in the 21st century, we still struggle with "certain" regulatory and statuatory requirements.
    It is counter-intuitive to my belief that NO ONE should die during a training exercise.
    Art

    ReplyDelete

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