Friday, November 7, 2008

This Blog Open All Night

This post is supposed to run about 700 words but instead, because of the budget crunch, 300 words will be closed during the day, only to reappear at night during busier times. Sounds ridiculous but even more so when one discovers city and county officials think along these lines.

The Mayor of Philadelphia is closing fire stations but you can trust him. He claims service won't diminish at all. Obviously failing to see the pink elephant in the room he states this with a straight face. Aren't Mayoral aides around to correct their masters? Or, are they hiding from Philly's bravest?

The FDNY is closing shop on five engine companies during daylight hours because fires only occur at night. In addition, lest a firefighter learn a valuable skill, probationary school is now going to be cut by five weeks. Pesky thing that education.

Atlanta is using rolling brownouts wherein a ladder company is shut down because it costs money to run a fire department. Instead of the Mayor leading the charge on this one the fire chief is the public face of a poor policy. Perhaps a run for Mayor is in his future?

We have seen this before. In New York in the 70s and Boston in the 80s fire departments declined, calls went up and firefighters battled during "the war years."

Excuse the sarcasm but lives are at stake. Rescue1.com readers see it but our elected officials and their minions are too busy preparing to fiddle while Rome burns.
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3 comments:

  1. Isn't this ironic, don't you think. Just this rotation my company has discussed this very topic and the ramifications to our department and many others. We look back at the "good years" in the department and we see a budget that is much decreased and staffing that is almost more that 100 firefighters less than what it was just a decade ago. Five and six man staffing to 3 on engines and ladders and 2 on the rescue and haz-mat.

    As many run the numbers on a regular basis, we see that the overall number of fires continue to decrease while the number of firefighter fatalities continues to stay steady. What is the number one reason that this is the case? Many say that we are not being safe, in-shape, or wearing our seat belts. Why there are many of these that are true, much of the stress that occurs which translates into cardiovascular difficulties is the cause of doing the work that was spread among many more firefighters just a few short years ago.

    The fire department is the easiest department for the city to justify pulling money from because we do not tend to make our own. But cutting funds also cuts safety. At some point those that legislate must look at the common sence and do the right thing. But after all if common sence is common than everyone would have it...its rare sence because it is rare that anyone actually does.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Isn't this ironic, don't you think. Just this rotation my company has discussed this very topic and the ramifications to our department and many others. We look back at the "good years" in the department and we see a budget that is much decreased and staffing that is almost more that 100 firefighters less than what it was just a decade ago. Five and six man staffing to 3 on engines and ladders and 2 on the rescue and haz-mat.

    As many run the numbers on a regular basis, we see that the overall number of fires continue to decrease while the number of firefighter fatalities continues to stay steady. What is the number one reason that this is the case? Many say that we are not being safe, in-shape, or wearing our seat belts. Why there are many of these that are true, much of the stress that occurs which translates into cardiovascular difficulties is the cause of doing the work that was spread among many more firefighters just a few short years ago.

    The fire department is the easiest department for the city to justify pulling money from because we do not tend to make our own. But cutting funds also cuts safety. At some point those that legislate must look at the common sence and do the right thing. But after all if common sence is common than everyone would have it...its rare sence because it is rare that anyone actually does.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just Monday night, we were sitting at the fire station trying to figure out how we were going to pay for a new $305,000 fire truck to replace one purchased in 1969.
    Grant money is drying up. Tax base is shrinking with de-valued properties. Nothing has changed. People are still driving like idiots and having accidents and stuff still burns.
    And you can't blame that on the Republicans!
    Welcome to the Kitchen Table. I have the big spoon.
    Art

    ReplyDelete

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